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Review by Tiffany Markman, mom to a one-year-old, tries to balance her workaholism with cuddling her daughter, reading books, consuming caffeine & reining in her intrinsic kugelry. Follow her on twitter.

When I was pregnant, I read The Day-By-Day Pregnancy Book (editor: Dr Maggie Blott; DK Publishing) every day. That’s the point of a day-by-day book, I suppose.

It was (bizarrely, given that I’m such a control freak) the only preggie book I consulted during that time, and the best part was the daily access to extraordinary photographs, 3D scan pictures and illustrations that explained exactly what was going on for each of those 40 sometimes-blissful-sometimes-scary weeks.

Once my daughter arrived, it got harder, because the daily wisdom was gone, as was the time to read – and I didn’t have the inclination to pore through multiple books to find an answer. (I also didn’t love the What To Expect books, which are nannyish.)

credit:mummasaysmail.wordpress.com

credit:mummasaysmail.wordpress.com

How I wish I’d had The Day-By-Day Baby Book, which provides in-depth daily advice on baby care and development – from boob handling to bonding. Whether your baby is 7 days old, 7 weeks old or 7 months old, the info is there, and you can read on a page-per-day basis or just dip in for practical help as you need to.

Typically, the contributors and editor (Dr Ilona Bendefy) include experts in areas ranging from paediatrics and midwifery to psychology and nutrition; atypically, they don’t dictate what you should do, or promote agendas. What a nice change!

For instance, in the ‘Sleeping Arrangements’ section, you’ll find options: in my bed, in a portable cot in my room, in a full-size cot in his own room, etc. There’s info on changing a disposable nappy and changing a reusable nappy. There’s breast and bottle feeding. And there’s sleep training vs put-Baby-into-the-bed-right-away.

The only down-side of the preggie version, which isn’t the case in this new volume, is that they ran out of things to say, so by 39 weeks the advice was a bit fluffy and the content a bit weak. This doesn’t happen in the Baby Book, probably because parenting a baby is so multi-faceted (read: chaotic) that there’s loads to cover.

In short? If you buy nothing else, buy this. And it’ll make a wonderful gift as well.

 Click here to order this book onine from Red Pepper Books

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